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Giant Eyeball

Giant Eyeball

In August, a recently vacant lot between Main and Elm Streets, across the street from the Joule Hotel, revealed an eyeball that had popped up. Since then, the image of Tony Tasset’s sculpture, which is a magnified replica of his own eye, has generated a lot of discussions. Mayor Rawlings called it a harbinger of things to come, adding that it’s a “sign of what could help energize downtown.”  The perpetually glaring, unblinking stare of Doctor T. J. Eckleburg in The Great Gatsby, according to our own Glenn Hunter, is comparable to advertising that serves as a sort of questionable symbol for a moral cosmos, ante-using Pascal’s Wager.

The Giant Eyeball near Dallas is a giant eyeball sculpture that was installed on top of the Reunion Tower. Originally designed as an advertisement for the Texas State Fair, it has since become one of Dallas’s most recognizable landmarks and tourist attractions.

In 2013, the enormous eye was taken from its hiding place in Minnesota and brought to Texas. It was bought by the hotel as part of their extensive art collection, to anchor their downtown facility and sculpture garden.

The Giant Eyeball in Dallas is a huge tourist attraction, and it’s easy to see why. This giant eyeball sculpture was created by artist Claes Oldenburg in 1994, and it stands over 40 feet tall. The eyeball has a diameter of about 18 feet! It’s made out of steel and painted with bright colors to make it pop against the sky.

Giant Eyeball in Dallas is a must-see for all who are looking to take a step back from the busy lifestyle of the city. The Giant eyeball has been around since 1974 and was created by artist, Claes Oldenburg. It stands 20 feet tall and is made out of steel, aluminum, fiberglass, and paint. This piece of art can be found on Turtle Creek Boulevard near Central Expressway in Dallas, Texas.

Mayor Rawlings praised it as a sign of the kinds of initiatives that may help revitalize downtown. In The Great Gatsby, our own Glenn Hunter compared Doctor T. J. Eckleburg’s glaring, ever-fixed gaze to an advertising image that serves as a sort of ambivalent metaphor for a moral cosmos, according to Pascal.

They may also be seen as a tongue-in-cheek allusion to an ever-watching Big Brother in the wake of NSA surveillance revelations.

Old Red Museum of Dallas County History & Culture

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